This Week’s Featured Watch #45 – the 4-760182 Skeleton

‘Skeletonized’ watches may not be to everyone’s taste – me included in fact! – but they are nevertheless an interesting type of watch. And to be fair they make it easy to see what’s going on inside without taking anything apart 🙂

Citizen’s first skeleton models were made in 1971, using the 76xx movement. These are essentially the 25 jewel 7290 (i.e. hacking) version of the 72xx family, with no date or day wheels and with modified plates with special finishes to enhance the see through, or see into, nature of the type. See the 72 Family Tree to see where these fit:  http://homepage.ntlworld.com/stephen.netherwood/72Leopard&SevenStarFamilyTreeSecure.pdf

This movement runs at 21,600 beats per hour, and was produced for only about 3 years  when it was replaced by the 8060A, running at 28,800 beats per hour. These later models can quickly be identified by the position of the Citizen logo – it was moved from being stamped on the movement itself at 9 o’clock (76xx) to being printed on the chapter ring at 6 o’clock (8060). There are no serial numbers on the skeletonized models so an exact year of production cannot be determined.

The 76xx skeletons were produced with stainless steel, gold plated or black coated cases and the movements were finished in either gold or black, and had three types of second hand design as far as I can determine. As far as I can see the main hands were of two types, one of which is lumed. Mine is a black cased model with gold plated movement, lumed main hands and red ‘lollipop’ second hand:

The stainless steel model with black coated movement can be seen in two of the above images, whilst here are examples from the 1971 catalog, which have a standard second hand and non-lumed main hands:

And two other models from the 1973 catalog with more rounded black cases, black movements, a Cosmotron type second hand and lumed main hands:

Note the original retail prices – these were quite expensive watches in their day, using good quality, accurate and reliable movements.

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9 Responses to This Week’s Featured Watch #45 – the 4-760182 Skeleton

  1. Mark Shaper says:

    Interesting article. Do you have any idea of the value of the original skeleton watch (25 jewel). Thanks

    • sweephand says:

      Hi Mark, I prefer not to try and give valuations, partly because I might get it very wrong! There are so many variables and what might be interesting or attractive about a watch to me may not be so for someone else. My advice would be to search the internet and eBay to see how much watches are selling for. Searching eBay to include completed listings can be very useful.

      Hope that helps a bit!
      Stephen

  2. boga says:

    I do like skeleton watches, and your Citizen is one of the most beatuful examples that I’ve ever seen. Congratulations for the watch, and for your blog.

    • sweephand says:

      Thanks for your comments, they are much appreciated 🙂 I know that skeleton watches are not to everyone’s liking, but they are interesting and it’s nice to see the movement in action,

      Stephen

  3. teatimecrumpet says:

    I can’t believe how perfect yours is! I stumbled on your blog because I’m looking at an 8060 but not nearly in the pristine condition that yours is in.

    Jealous.

    • sweephand says:

      Hi – thanks for visiting my blog, but I’m sorry to leave you feeling jealous! 🙂 I was lucky to get hold of one of these in such condition – the printing on the glass back is often worn on these. I don’t think it’s been worn very much at all.

      Stephen

  4. Pingback: Info about Citizen Skeleton Automatic

  5. I grew up mesmerized by this watch, which belongs to my beloved father. It put a spell at such an early age that I can’t remember a time before it. The watch also created an early appreciation within me for all things mechanical, beautiful and refined, yet practical.

    The watch was given to my father as a gift from his brother. It currently sits in his drawer, aching to be restored. I’ll be trying to find a watch repair person in the Atlanta area to see if we can’t get it back into action!

    Thank you for posting this, and with such terrific photos! It is a wonderfully nostalgic treat to take in!

    • sweephand says:

      Hi Joel, thanks for visiting my blog 🙂 It’s always good to hear from someone who has a personal story about one of the watches. I can understand why the skeleton model was mesmerising when you were a child. I hope you can find a good watch maker who can give it the respect it deserves 🙂

      Stephen

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